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Will Apple ship Vision Pro preorders to your door on February 2nd?

Reports preceding Apple’s Vision Pro release date announcement said buyers would have to go to Apple retail stores to pick up the spatial computer, but only after a proper fitting. But now that Apple has actually announced the preorder and release dates, I started wondering whether that would actually be the case.

Apple has revealed the contents of the Vision Pro retail box, which offers a couple of options for the strap that will hold the Vision Pro against your face and the Light Seal that will prevent light leakage. It seemed like Apple was already looking to roll out Vision Pro sales similar to other Apple hardware purchases that do not require an in-store appointment.

Recent discoveries indicate that might be true. Vision Pro appointments might not be mandatory for early buyers after all. But Apple is still inviting prospective buyers to in-store demos, which should offer a great Vision Pro experience, at least regarding the custom fit.

What’s in the box

Again, here’s what Apple will put in the Vision Pro box:

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Apple Vision Pro comes with a Solo Knit Band and Dual Loop Band — giving users two options for the fit that works best for them. Apple Vision Pro also includes a Light Seal, two Light Seal Cushions, an Apple Vision Pro Cover for the front of the device, Polishing Cloth, Battery, USB-C Charge Cable, and USB-C Power Adapter.

The choice between Solo Knit and Dual Loop bands will help you find the best headband to wear the Vision Pro comfortably. The former is elastic, so it might not require a custom fit. The Dual Loop has two loops, as the name implies, one going at the top of your head. Both of them are adjustable, as seen below.

The other Vision Pro customization you might need concerns the Light Seal. Specifically, the cushions have to offer a tight fit that will not allow light to leak inside the device while you’re using it. The two cushions in the package might get the job done. They also flex “gently” to adapt to various face shapes.

Apple Vision Pro with Dual Loop Band.Apple Vision Pro with Dual Loop Band. Image source: Apple Inc.

Not all heads and faces are similar, of course. But Apple might have devised these Vision Pro accessories based on plenty of measurements. The final designs for the headbands and cushions might allow enough wiggle room to accommodate most head types. Then again, the accessories that come in the box might not fit every potential user.

Having the Vision Pro fit perfectly is key for the experience. Apple would not want early users to be uncomfortable wearing the spatial computer to the point where that would become a big issue. That’s where in-store fittings might help.

At-home Vision Pro face scans?

While we have to wait for next Friday’s preorders to start for more information on Vision Pro shipping and fitting requirements, there’s a development you should be aware of.

Code in the App Store app indicates that users might take face scans with their iPhones to determine their size for the Vision Pro. MacRumors contributor Aaron Perris found this reference in the code:

You may scan your face to determine your size for Apple Vision Pro.

Apple has been using an app to find the correct sizes of Vision Pro accessories for the developers testing the spatial computer. Maybe the same functionality is coming to the App Store so buyers can perform the scans at home. Based on those findings, the App Store app could let them customize the Vision Pro sizes before the preorder ship.

Vision Pro's modular components.Vision Pro’s modular components. Image source: Apple Inc.

Or maybe the newly discovered App Store app functionality might be enabled after the first Vision Pro batch is sold.

I will point out that Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman said a few weeks ago that at-home fittings might be available via apps:

A remaining question around the Vision Pro is if Apple will offer online preorders from the get-go. My guess is you’ll be able to reserve a Vision Pro on Apple.com, create an appointment time, then go to your closest Apple store to get fitted with the right light seal, band and cushioning. This will require a face scan app, which at some point Apple could release to online-only customers to allow purchases without going to a store. But it’s plausible proper preorders for shipment to customer homes won’t be available at the initial launch.

Vision Pro demos

I can see why Vision Pro buyers would want to ensure a proper fit. I’m one of them, and I’ll want to be comfortable wearing this thing for at least a few hours at a time if I were to incorporate it into my workflow eventually. For that to happen, the weight can’t be a problem. While I don’t expect issues on that front, the Vision Pro should weigh about a pound. That might be too heavy for some.

In such cases, custom fittings will be a must. And it looks like Apple is ready for in-store Vision Pro demos. Emails sent out to people subscribed to the Vision Pro newsletter inform customers that they’ll be able to get Vision Pro demos come February 2nd, Lifehacker reports. Here’s what the email says:

Starting at 8:00 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 2, we invite you to sign up for a demo of Apple Vision Pro at your local Apple Store. Demo times will be available Friday through the weekend on a first-come, first-served basis. We can’t wait to see you there.

The Light Seal attached magnetically to the Vision Pro's aluminum frame.The Light Seal attached magnetically to the Vision Pro’s aluminum frame. Image source: Apple Inc.

What’s interesting in the wording is the apparent time limit. Apple seems to imply that demos will be available only during the weekend. This is a further hint that Apple won’t require Vision Pro fittings for most people. Or that the Vision Pro should sell out that in-store demos will be pointless, at least initially.

The desired outcome for these demos is a purchase from the tester. But if Apple doesn’t have enough stock to go around, it won’t be able to sell you a unit if you’re happy with your demo experience.

As you can see, there’s a lot of speculation here. Hopefully, by this time next week, we’ll know exactly what the Vision Pro order process involves.

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